The Japanese Christmas Market in Berlin ☆ Der Japanische Weihnachtsmarkt in Berlin

Diesen Beitrag auf Deutsch lesen? Bitte scrollen.

Japanese Christmas Market, ジャパニーズクリスマスマーケット, japanischer Weihnachtsmarkt, 日本のクリスマスマーケット, Berlin, ベルリン, Fest, 祭り, Straßenfest, festival, Weihnachten, Christmas, クリスマス, 2015Wow, in less than a week we have Christmas!! It is the same every year and every year I’m surprised by how fast time rushes until the end of the year. December is over until you really recognize the pre-Christmas season.
To have at least one Christmas topic here on the blog, I decided to talk a little about one Christmas market, I went to this year. There are many Christmas markets in Germany, also very famous ones like in Dresden for example, but the one for today is the Japanese Christmas market in Berlin, which took place on December 5th and 6th. It is quite new (the second year) and if I didn’t got the hint from my friend, who went there last year, I maybe wouldn’t have checked it out yet.

Hah, a Japanese Christmas market? What do “Japan” and “Christmas” have in common? Not so much actually – and yes, it sounds strange at first, but all in all you could say: The Japanese Christmas market is just a market with goods, food and entertainment related to Japan. (It also could be held in summer season as a summer festival or in autumn as an autumn event.)
Japanese Christmas Market, ジャパニーズクリスマスマーケット, japanischer Weihnachtsmarkt, 日本のクリスマスマーケット, Berlin, ベルリン, 祭り, festival, 2015, japanisch, Japanese, 日本, kimono, 着物The good thing, in my opinion, is the idea for this event. Indeed there could have been more stands (it was just half of the hall, the other half was fenced off), but the organizers learned from the last year and chose a much bigger location this time. Last year the Christmas market was located at the “Urban Spree” premises, this year it moved to the “ARENA BERLIN”. Knowing it would be a location with more space, I was quite surprised to find an AMAZING long queue of people waiting at the entrance at 12:15. (The market opened at 12:00) The waiting time took 30 minutes and the entrance price increased to 3,- €, which was one Euro more than expected but still ok for the location inside the hall with a little outdoor area at the backside.

Japanese Christmas Market, ジャパニーズクリスマスマーケット, japanischer Weihnachtsmarkt, 日本のクリスマスマーケット, Berlin, ベルリン, 祭り, festival, 2015, japanisch, Japanese, 日本, sake, 酒Fortunately it seemed to be not that much crowded inside, since people had enough space to disperse. But the later it got, the more people came in and queued in front of the stands – especially the ones, that were selling food. There was a surprisingly huge variety of different Japanese food like ramen (Japanese noodle soup), karē (Japanese curry dish), okonomiyaki (non-sweet cabbage-pancake), takoyaki (pancake-balls filled with octopus), Japanese style hot dogs, Japanese style crêpes, bento boxes (lunch boxes, mostly filled with rice, vegetables and fish or meat) and several Japanese finger food products. As drinks you could taste sake (Japanese rice wine), shōchū (Japanese brandy) or green tea in some variations.

Japanese Christmas Market, ジャパニーズクリスマスマーケット, japanischer Weihnachtsmarkt, 日本のクリスマスマーケット, Berlin, ベルリン, 祭り, festival, 2015, japanisch, Japanese, 日本, sushi, すし, 寿司I ate karē on that day, which sadly wasn’t my taste… Japanese karē has a much milder taste than Indian curry anyway because the sauce is usually an instant one, but this curry was far too mild, I think…° Although the German-looking sellers had a big slogan promoting “original Japanese karē” at their stand.
Japanese Christmas Market, ジャパニーズクリスマスマーケット, japanischer Weihnachtsmarkt, 日本のクリスマスマーケット, Berlin, ベルリン, Fest, 祭り, festival, Weihnachten, Christmas, クリスマス, 2015, black sesame brownieTherefore the brownie with black sesame and yuzu-topping (yuzu is a Japanese lemon) that I had to a matcha latte at another stand was delicious.
Actually I wanted to eat Gyūdon (a bowl of rice with topped boiled thin beef slices mixed with onions – one of my Japanese food favourites), but the order failed because the rice was not ready yet… For okonomiyaki the queue was a bit too long and reading all this could make you think, that I had a bad day on this event, but then one dish made my day – though I have to say, that it was shamefully not Japanese… From the little Winterdorf, Weihnachtsmarkt, Christmas Market, クリスマスマーケット, Berlin, ベルリン, Weihnachten, Christmas, クリスマス, Fest, 祭り, 2015, pulled pork, cheeze noodlesoutdoor area at the backside of the hall you could right enter another Christmas market next door, the “Winterdorf” (“winter village”), where I ate pulled pork with cheese noodles – delicious! The pulled pork had been slowly cooked for 14 hours!
Surprisingly I also found some Japanese food on the Winterdorf Christmas market: Taiyaki. Taiyaki is a a sweet waffle in the shape of a fish. The name means “fried sea bream” according to the shape. Taiyaki are usually filled with red beans paste, but at this stand you could also choose “choco-banana” what I did. The dough was made with green tea taste, that was a bit strong (usually there is just used normal dough for taiyaki), but all in all it was tasty. ^^ And taiyaki look so cute. ♥

Winterdorf, Weihnachtsmarkt, Christmas Market, クリスマスマーケット, Berlin, ベルリン, Fest, 祭り, 2015, taiyaki, 鯛焼き, japanisch, Japanese, 日本Nevertheless Japanese food in general taste better at other places (to me). For example in Japan directly, in one of the many Japanese restaurants (in Berlin or somewhere else in Germany or in other European countries) or well, at home, because at home everything is tasty, don’t you think? On festivals everything is done fast; so sometimes the quality decreases. Ramen f.e. I really prefer to eat in the restaurant and not in passing on a festival.

Japanese Christmas Market, ジャパニーズクリスマスマーケット, japanischer Weihnachtsmarkt, 日本のクリスマスマーケット, Berlin, ベルリン, 祭り, festival, 2015, japanisch, Japanese, goods, Handwerk, crafts, MerchandiseBut back to the Japanese Christmas market. Of course there were also other stands without food. You could find handcrafts or unusual design pieces, fashion, jewelry, handmade ceramics, art prints, manga/anime merchandise, paintings, stationery. One stand had amazing beautiful architectural photos of Japanese city night scenes as posters, calendar or postcards. Another stand sold indoor plants (苔玉, kokedama) which you could hang into your room without a plant pot! They just had a ball of soil and moss around the roots. And then there were these beautiful chalk drawings!
Many stands were a bit minimalist, but interesting.

Japanese Christmas Market, ジャパニーズクリスマスマーケット, japanischer Weihnachtsmarkt, 日本のクリスマスマーケット, Berlin, ベルリン, 祭り, festival, 2015, japanisch, Japanese, photography, Foto, Yuto Yamada  Japanese Christmas Market, ジャパニーズクリスマスマーケット, japanischer Weihnachtsmarkt, 日本のクリスマスマーケット, Berlin, ベルリン, 祭り, festival, 2015, japanisch, Japanese, moss ball, Moosball, kokedama, 苔玉

Japanese Christmas Market, ジャパニーズクリスマスマーケット, japanischer Weihnachtsmarkt, 日本のクリスマスマーケット, Berlin, ベルリン, 2015, japanisch, Japanese, 日本, godzilla, ゴジラ, art, Kunst

a Japanese art project and an illuminated Christmas Godzilla at the entrance ☆ ein japanisches Kunstprojekt und ein beleuchteter Weihnachts-Godzilla am Eingang

The stage programm was traditional music and a one-person-dance-perfomance of a woman dressed in a kimono, when I was there. Another funny thing to watch was the sumo wrestling area, where volunteers could jump into a big sumo figure suit and have a fight against each other. ^^°

Japanese Christmas Market, ジャパニーズクリスマスマーケット, japanischer Weihnachtsmarkt, 日本のクリスマスマーケット, Berlin, ベルリン, 祭り, festival, 2015, japanisch, Japanese, 日本, kimono, 着物, dance performance Japanese Christmas Market, ジャパニーズクリスマスマーケット, japanischer Weihnachtsmarkt, 日本のクリスマスマーケット, Berlin, ベルリン, 祭り, festival, 2015, japanisch, Japanese, sumo wrestling, 相撲

 

 

 

 

 



Altogether it is a nice event to visit around Christmas season and I hope, it will increase the next years with more stands, more items and variety at each stand and more food (for so many people). Let’s make it popular!

There’s only one thing left to say: メリークリスマス!(Merii Kurisumasu, pronounce: [Merii Kuris’mas’] ) – Merry Christmas!

Winterdorf, Weihnachtsmarkt, Christmas Market, クリスマスマーケット, Berlin, ベルリン, Fest, 祭り, festival, 2015, Christmas tree, Weihnachtsbaum, クリスマスツリー


Der Japanische Weihnachtsmarkt in Berlin

Wow, in weniger als einer Woche haben wir Weihnachten!! Es ist jedes Jahr das Gleiche und jedes Jahr bin ich wieder überrascht, wie schnell die Zeit bis zum Jahresende vergeht. Der Dezember ist vorüber, ehe man die Vorweihnachtszeit mitbekommt.
Damit wenigstens noch ein Weihnachtsthema auf den Blog kommt, habe ich beschlossen, ein bisschen über einen Weihnachtsmarkt zu erzählen, auf dem ich dieses Jahr war. Es gibt viele Weihnachtsmärkte in Deutschland, auch sehr bekannte wie z.B. in Dresden, aber für heute ist es der Japanische Weihnachtsmarkt in Berlin, der am 5. und 6. Dezember stattfand. Er ist recht neu (das zweite Jahr) und wenn ich nicht den Tipp meiner Freundin bekommen hätte, die letztes Jahr dort gewesen ist, hätte ich ihn vielleicht noch nicht ausprobiert.

Häh, ein japanischer Weihnachtsmarkt? Was haben „Japan“ und „Weihnachten“ denn gemeinsam? Nicht sehr viel eigentlich – und ja, es hört sich erst mal komisch an, aber alles in allem kann man sagen: Der Japanische Weihnachtsmarkt ist ein Markt mit Waren, Speisen und Entertainment im Bezug auf Japan. (Es könnte also auch in der Sommersaison als Sommer-Festival oder im Herbst als Herbst-Event veranstaltet werden.)
Das Gute daran ist meiner Meinung nach die Idee für dieses Event. Tatsächlich hätte es mehr Stände geben können (es war die Hälfte der Halle, die andere Hälfte war abgesperrt), aber die Organisatoren haben vom letzten Jahr gelernt und sich dieses Mal eine größere Location gesucht. Letztes Jahr war der Weihnachtsmarkt auf dem „Urban Spree“-Gelände, dieses Jahr ist er zur „ARENA BERLIN“ umgezogen.
Mit dem Wissen, dass es sich um einen größeren Veranstaltungsort handeln würde, war ich ziemlich erstaunt, eine UNFASSBAR lange Schlange von Wartenden um 12:15 Uhr am Eingang vorzufinden. (Der Markt hatte seit 12:00 Uhr geöffnet.). Die Wartezeit betrug 30 Minuten und der Eintrittspreis verteuerte sich auf 3.- €, was ein Euro mehr war, als erwartet, aber immer noch ok für die Location in der Halle mit einem kleinen Außenbereich an der Rückseite.

Glücklicherweise kam es einem drinnen gar nicht so voll vor, weil die Leute genug Platz hatten, sich zu zerstreuen. Aber je später es wurde, desto mehr Leute kamen hinein und sammelten sich in Schlangen vor den Ständen – vor allem vor denen, die Essen anboten. Es gab eine überraschend große Auswahl an verschiedenen japanischen Speisen wie Ramen (japanische Nudelsuppe), Karē (japanisches Curry-Gericht), Okonomiyaki (herzhafter Kohl-Pfannkuchen), Takoyaki (Pfannkuchen-Bällchen gefüllt mit Oktopus), Hot Dogs in japanischem Stil, Crêpes in japanischem Stil, Bento-Boxen (Lunch-Pakete, meist gefüllt mit Reis, Gemüse und Fisch oder Fleisch) und verschiedenen japanischen Finger Food-Produkten. Zu Trinken gab es Sake (japanischen Reiswein), Shōchū (japanischen Branntwein) oder grünen Tee in verschiedenen Varianten.

Ich habe ein Karē an diesem Tag gegessen, was leider nicht mein Geschmack war… Japanisches Karē hat sowieso einen sehr viel milderen Geschmack als indisches Curry, da die Sauce meistens ein Instant-Produkt ist, aber dieses Curry war einfach zu mild, finde ich…° Obwohl die deutsch aussehenden Verkäuferinnen mit großem Slogan für „orginal Japanese karē“ an ihrem Stand warben.
Dafür war der Brownie mit schwarzem Sesam und Yuzu-Topping (Yuzu ist eine japanische Zitrone), den ich zu einem Matcha Latte an einem anderen Stand hatte, ausgezeichnet.
Eigentlich hatte ich vorgehabt, Gyūdon zu essen (eine Schale Reis mit gekochten dünnen Rindfleischscheiben und Zwiebeln – eines meiner japanischen Lieblingsessen), aber die Bestellung scheiterte leider daran, dass der Reis noch nicht fertig war. Für Okonomiyaki war die Schlange ein bisschen zu lang und wenn man all das hier liest, könnte man meinen, dass ich echt einen schlechten Tag an diesem Event hatte, aber dann rettete mir ein Gericht eben diesen – obwohl ich sagen muss, dass es peinlicherweise kein japanisches war… Vom kleinen Außenbereich auf der Rückseite der Halle konnte man direkt den nächsten Weihnachtsmarkt auf dem Nachbargelände betreten, das „Winterdorf“, wo ich „pulled pork“ (also Schweinefleisch) mit Käsenudeln gegessen habe – köstlich! Das „pulled pork“ wurde 14 Stunden gekocht! Überraschenderweise fand ich auf dem Winterdorf-Weihnachtsmarkt auch japanisches Essen: Taiyaki. Taiyaki ist eine süße Waffel in der Form eines Fisches. Der Name bedeutet „gebratene Meerbrasse“, enstprechend der Form. Taiyaki sind üblicherweise mit roter Bohnenpaste gefüllt, aber an diesem Stand konnte man auch die Geschmacksrichtung „choco-banana“ wählen, was ich tat. Der Teig war mit grünem-Tee-Geschmack gemacht, der etwas stark durchkam (normalerweise ist es ganz normaler Teig für Taiyaki), aber alles in allem war es lecker. ^^ Und Taiyaki sehen so süß aus. ♥

Trotzdem schmeckt (mir) japanisches Essen generell an anderen Plätzen besser. Zum Beispiel in Japan direkt, in den vielen japanischen Restaurants (ob nun in Berlin, anderswo in Deutschland oder im europäischen Ausland) oder eben zuhause, denn zuhause schmeckt ja eh immer alles lecker, oder? Auf Festen muss alles schnell gehen; darunter leidet dann auch mal die Qualität. Ramen z.B. esse ich viel lieber im Restaurant als zwischen Tür und Angel auf einem Fest.

Aber zurück zum Japanischen Weihnachtsmarkt. Natürlich gab es auch andere Stände ohne Essen. Man konnte Handwerk oder ungewöhnliche Design-Stücke finden, Mode, Schmuck, selbstgemachte Keramik, Kunstdrucke, Manga-/Anime-Merchandise, Bilder, Papierwaren. Ein Stand hatte beeindruckend schöne Architektur-Fotos von nächtlichen japanischen Stadtansichten als Poster, Kalender oder Postkarten. Ein anderer Stand verkaufte Zimmerpflanzen (苔玉, Kokedama), die man sich ohne Topf einfach in den Raum hängen konnte! Sie hatten nur eine Kugel aus Erde und Moos um die Wurzeln. Und dann gab es diese schönen Kreide-Zeichnungen!
Viele Stände waren ein wenig minimalistisch, aber interessant.

Das Bühnenprogramm bildete traditionelle Musik und eine ein-Personen-Tanz-Performance einer Frau im Kimono, als ich dort war. Auch sehr lustig anzusehen war der Sumo-Wrestling-Bereich, wo Freiwillige in einen großen Sumo-Figur-Anzug springen und gegeneinander kämpfen konnten. ^^°

Insgesamt war es ein schönes Event in der Weihnachtssaison und ich hoffe, dass es die nächsten Jahre noch größer wird mit mehr Ständen, mehr Produkten und Auswahl an den einzelnen Ständen und mehr Essen (für so viele Leute). Lasst es uns bekannt machen!

Bleibt nur noch zu sagen: メリークリスマス!(Merii Kurisumasu, sprich: [Merii Kuris’mas’] ) – Fröhliche Weihnachten!

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “The Japanese Christmas Market in Berlin ☆ Der Japanische Weihnachtsmarkt in Berlin

  1. Es ist interessant, bei dir einen “japanischen ” Weihnachtsmarkt gibt .
    In Fukuoka öffnet jetzt einen ” deutschen” Weihnachtsmarkt 🙂
    Dann, ich wünsche dir frohe Weihnachten!

    Like

    • Ich find’s auch spannend. ^^
      Oh, in Fukuoka gibt es einen deutschen Weihnachtsmarkt? Das ist toll! Ich weiß, dass es ein paar Weihnachtsmärkte (vielleicht auch deutch-inspirierte) in Japan gibt, aber es ist bestimmt sehr selten. Daher freut es dich bestimmt besonders, dass gerade in Fukuoka einer ist. ^^
      Frohe Weihanchten, Rumiko!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s